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sometimeaftertwoam

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sometimeaftertwoam last won the day on July 26 2018

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About sometimeaftertwoam

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  1. There's a widely accepted structural perimeter, or axiom in screenwriting that generally insists on character arc. "In what ways is your character different in the end from in the beginning?" Consider Anton Chigurh in No Country For Old Men and Daniel Plainview in There Will Be Blood. I see no arc in who they are as people/characters. Yes, the story itself has an arc, but how are either of these characters different in the end from the beginning? Other examples of such?

    1. Show previous comments  6 more
    2. paleyellow

      paleyellow

      Yes, this is a pet peeve of mine. Character arc is a tool. It's a means to story, not the ends. Usually the protagonist changes. There are internal obstacles he faces and he must grow to overcome them. But the key is the OBSTACLE, not the change. In some stories, the obstacle the hero faces is tremendous pressure to change, and to succeed he must resist that pressure. Usually his resistance to change and his strength in this scenario causes OTHERS to change around him. Han Solo becomes mo...

    3. drb000

      drb000

      I think in any movie, either the character has to change, or their circumstances have to. Like in "The Pursuit of Happyness" - his character doesn't change much, but by the end he has a job at Dean Witter. In "There Will be Blood" Daniel Plainview is in a much different place at the end of the movie then he was at the beginning.

    4. sometimeaftertwoam

      sometimeaftertwoam

      But he's the exact same cunt in the end. If not bigger. That's my point.

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